Patte Rosebank

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Patte Rosebank

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 1,438 total)
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  • Patte Rosebank
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    @Irish10, the FDA has ruled that the Actavis version is the only generic equivalent to Concerta. The Mallinckrodt and Kudco versions are not.

    http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm422568.htmmobile.

    nytimes.com/2015/06/17/business/generic-ritalin-drug-not-equivalent-to-the-brand-is-in-use-anyway.html?referer=&_r=0

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    in reply to: Diagnosed a few days ago #127468

    Patte Rosebank
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    Hey,@Dougyhowzer!

    You sure came to the right place!

    I was diagnosed, completely out of the blue, 5 years ago. Until then, I was like most other people, positive that “ADHD is just an excuse for people who can’t be bothered to control their children and raise them properly”.

    Funny how finding out that YOU have it, can completely change that belief.

    Like you, I immediately became very interested in learning as much as I could, about this suddenly-very-real neurological condition, and how it has affected me throughout my life. I’ve read books, watched videos, and visited websites. I soon learned how to spot whether or not a source was reliable…and supportive. And TotallyADD is one of the best.

    The Videos page is a great place to start: Short videos, some factual, some funny, some both.

    If you have any questions about navigating the website, just scroll to the bottom of the page, and click on “CONTACT”.

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    in reply to: My experiences with Concerta #127461

    Patte Rosebank
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    @Kirky, how are you doing?

    I thought of something you might want to discuss with your doctor or pharmacist.

    If the Concerta was helping you with some things, but was also making you feel so anxious, maybe the problem was that you were started on too high a dose, instead of starting low and gradually increasing it.

    I remember, my doctor started me on a much lower dose, and gradually increased it, while I kept track of the results from day to day, with a simple meds-journal. That way, we could tell when we’d found the most effective, least troublesome, dose for me.

    When I had my oral surgery, I went off it for a month, during the worst part of the healing process. Going back onto it, I had to start low, and gradually work up to my usual dose again. Even so, I had the jitters at first, but they were tolerable. They wouldn’t have been, if I’d just gone right back onto my usual dose.

    On the other hand, as Scattybird says, we’re all different, so maybe it isn’t the right med for you. Discuss it with your doctor and your pharmacist. (Often, pharmacists know more about meds than doctors do.)

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    in reply to: Eating Overrides Beneficial Effects of Medication #127460

    Patte Rosebank
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    @Honda, have you considered seeing an endocrinologist? You could have some sort of metabolic or hormonal issue.

    I had symptoms like you describe, but long before I knew I had ADHD.

    In my case, I was developing Type-2 Diabetes, and the drowsiness after eating was because my body was no longer properly breaking down the increased blood-glucose that happens when we eat.

    Your symptoms could be a sign of pre-diabetes. Going too long without eating, makes blood-glucose go quite low. Then, when you eat something, blood-glucose suddenly soars, which makes you feel drowsy. In my case, I’d eat something, then quickly fall asleep on the couch for a couple of hours.

    After my Diabetes diagnosis, I learned that it isn’t just about keeping blood-glucose low; it’s about keeping it in a fairly steady range, by advance-planning and scheduling of meals & snacks. (Not easy for an ADDer to do.)

    There’s a specific test for Glucose Tolerance. After your fasting blood-glucose is checked, you’re given a very sugary solution to drink. After a while, they check your blood-glucose again, at intervals, to see how well your body has processed the sugar.

    If this test shows that you have trouble keeping your blood-glucose steady, you can talk with the endocrinologist about ways to even it out.

    What do you think?

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    in reply to: Disability AND ADHD #127459

    Patte Rosebank
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    @Ksmith, that’s a really difficult situation for you and your husband. How’s he doing on the Adderall, so far?

    For me, I’ve found that a positive “return on investment”, in the form of interaction with others, and positive comments from them, keeps me interested in pursuing a particular interest. If I have to do a project all by myself, the responsibilities and complexities (and risks) become so overwhelming that, even though it *was* something I really enjoy doing, I lose interest and give up, because the pain outweighs the pleasure.

    Are there friends or colleagues who could meet with your husband, to help him develop his ideas? Even sitting with him and discussing them will help draw the ideas out of his head, and form them into something more concrete. This needs to be ongoing, maybe a regular weekly get-together, because we ADDers tend to have terrific ideas, but they stay “ideas”, stuck in our heads, because we have trouble turning this motivation into activation…unless we’re working on it with other people.

    What do you think?

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    in reply to: Do adult ADHDers commonly talk in higher voice? #127392

    Patte Rosebank
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    I found that I could go even higher, if I inhaled instead of exhaling. It takes a lot of control to be able to do this without taking in so much air that the throat tightens up.  I use inhaling to imitate the squeak of a tiny kitten.

    Years ago, I made the mistake of trying to sing through terrible laryngitis.  I completely lost my voice for more than a week (couldn’t even whisper), and when my voice came back, I discovered that, when I yawned a certain way, I could produce a loud, piercing throat-whistle, like a subway train going around a curve of wet track. Evidently, I’d torn a hole in my vocal cords.

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    in reply to: Psychologist says he is curing ADHD #127340

    Patte Rosebank
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    @Shutterbug55, WNED keeps airing highly questionable “junk science” health specials like that. But will they air “ADD…And Loving It?!” or “…Mastering It?!”?

    Hell no!

     

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    in reply to: Dumbest thing; Joining the carnival #127333

    Patte Rosebank
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    One branch of my family was in the carnival business for many years. Peter March Shows travelled all over North America. Every so often, they’d come to my town, and we’d get free rides and candy floss.

    Back then, candy apples were made from scratch. Every Hallowe’en, my mom would use the family recipe to make a huge batch of them for trick-or-treaters and for me and my brother to hand out in class. On that one day, I had “friends”.

     

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    in reply to: Do adult ADHDers commonly talk in higher voice? #127325

    Patte Rosebank
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    For some of us, this leads to cartoon voice-work.

    I voiced 31 characters on the kids’ show “Mighty Machines”. It was more like play than work.

    I just voiced a bumper for an internet radio show, and I used one of my silliest, highest voices.

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    in reply to: Psychologist says he is curing ADHD #127320

    Patte Rosebank
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    Good for you for calling him on this!

    Anyone who claims to be able to “cure” ADHD is a fraud. You can no more cure ADHD than you can permanently change your brown eyes to blue.

    If a practitioner claims a huge success rate, but doesn’t have any hard data, over a long period of time, to prove it, that’s also the mark of a charlatan.

    And if he’s charging thousands of dollars for treatments with gadgets and methods that have been thoroughly debunked by legitimate scientific testing, that’s the third sign of a quack.

    Science-Based Medicine, Quackwatch, and the FDA have quite a bit to say about those brain-stimulating claims, and it’s not good.

    I’m reading a 1931 book called “100,000,000 Guinea Pigs”, which details the deadly “wild west” that existed before the FDA finally got the strong laws and enforcement resources it needed to protect the public. Some of the same scams and methods are still bring used today, in slightly different forms, including devices that use electrical and/or magnetic stimulation.

    Plus ca change…

     

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    Patte Rosebank
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    According to the latest information, one component of weed may help reduce the anxiety that often comes with ADHD, thus making it feel like it’s controlling your ADHD symptoms.

    But another component (THC, which is what produces a “high”) causes serious brain-damage, including schizophrenia, especially in developing brains. The danger isn’t so much the THC itself, but the super-high concentration of it that today’s weed—whether recreational or medicinal—has been cultivated to contain. The stuff that grows wild has about 1/10 the level of THC that the cultivated stuff does.

    I got this info (and more) from the video “ADHD, Marijuana, and Oh, Look…Cows!”.  ($9.99 at http://www.totallyaddshop.com/products/marijuana).

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    in reply to: need advice #127133

    Patte Rosebank
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    @SB12, Prozac (and Paxil) can be very dangerous for people with ADHD, especially if they’re also taking ADHD meds. The side effects can be so serious, and strike so suddenly, that the FDA has issued a “Black Box Warning” about it.

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    Patte Rosebank
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    I discovered another reason to advise your dentist about your ADHD meds.

    The freezing that the dentist uses contains Epinephrine (adrenaline), to increase the freezing’s effectiveness and duration. However, adrenaline is probably the last thing that patients with severe Anxiety or High Blood Pressure or who are taking stimulant medications need, especially in that situation.

    For them, dentists can use freezing with less Epinephrine. They can even use freezing with no Epinephrine at all, but only if the procedure is relatively minor, because the freezing would be mild and would only last about 5 minutes. And there’s a limit to how many doses can be safely given in an hour.

    One more thing: In the rare event that the freezing is accidentally injected into a vein instead of a nerve, it can provoke dangerously high blood pressure, panic, and mania in the above-mentioned patients.

    All things considered, it’s in our best interests to tell the dentist about our ADHD meds.

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    Patte Rosebank
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    This seems like as good a place as any to post about my ongoing attempts to get scheduled for major oral surgery.

    I finally got a date for my surgery. That surgery will be so extensive and traumatic that I’ll need general anaesthesia for it. However, it took THREE consultations and intervention by my doctor, dentist, and regular oral surgeon to convince them of the need for general anaesthesia—which was the only reason why my oral surgeon referred me to the hospital.

    The hospital gave me pages and pages of forms to fill in, detailing my complete medical and surgical history, all meds and supplements I’m taking, any conditions that might affect my surgery and/or recovery, etc., etc., etc.

    During the next few months, I’ll have several pre-op appointments, due to my other health issues.

    I’ve made it very clear to the hospital that, post-op, I don’t want any scary, addictive painkillers. Ibuprofen is the best one for dental pain, and it’s always served me well.

    The hospital was impressed by this, and by the fact that I knew so much dental terminology. Then they read my full dental history and realized why I knew so much dental terminology.

    “The Awful Tooth”: Dental issues are another of the expensive side effects of having ADHD.

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    Patte Rosebank
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    @Maclimber, I’ve been stuck in that rut of ennui and lack of motivation for a long time too. And I’m now having my first depressive episode in about 10 years.

    Going off meds won’t help; it’ll only make us even more scattered and less able to cope. Being on meds can give us the focus we need, but it’s up to us to choose what to focus on, and to take the first step…and the subsequent steps. That’s the hard part.

    I just posted about the psychology of hyperfocus and slot machines, in another thread. It explains the four things needed to engage hyperfocus. It might help you (and me!) to find both our motivation and our activation.

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 1,438 total)