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  • in reply to: is taekwondo safe for my hyperimpulsive 6 year old? #120457
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    ellamama
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    I’ve a close friend whose two daughters have ADHD and did taekwondo for several years. My friend RAVED about how great it was for her daughters. (The only reason they stopped was because the girls ended up getting involved in other athletics so they had to make a choice.) Instructors vary from one place to another, so do your homework, but it’s possible that the taekwondo can help kids develop more self-control; mindfulness; and get good physical exercise (which–according to some studies–helps ADHD as much as meds.)

    I’ve not yet enrolled my own daughter, but we’re going to try it. When discussing this with my impulsive, 9 y.o. daughter with ADHD, she asked, “If I get into trouble fighting at school, why would you let me take lessons to learn how to fight?” I explained that the purpose of taekowodo is to learn what to do when you think you need to or want to fight–more often than not, it means NOT fighting.

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    in reply to: Mom & Daughter – Accepting our oddities #120351
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    ellamama
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    LOL! That’s perfect! Believe me, you’re not alone!

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    in reply to: Overcoming Fidgeting for Short Periods of Time!!! #120313
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    ellamama
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    I like Scattybird’s suggestions. How about notetaking? Not only might that be less obviously “fidigity” but could give the impression that you’re organized and that the interview (and job) are important to you. (Of course, make sure it’s not only of those pens which can be “clicked” or easily disassembled!)

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    in reply to: well i was going to……but….. #115348
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    ellamama
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    LOL!!! This is hysterical–because it’s true! I swear I’ve done the same (okay, not actually the same, but analogous) thing. It drive my DH nuts!

    DH: “Why haven’t you put away the step stool I asked you to do last night?!”

    Me: “Uh…did you notice how I cleaned out the entire refrigerator? Not the vegetable bins don’t stink!”

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    in reply to: ADD a "Developmental Disability?" #104300
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    ellamama
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    One may consider ADHD a “developmental disability” like learning disabilities and, I suppose ASDs (Autism Spectrum Disorders). Over the years definitions of various “maladies” have changed. My favorite catch-all term for “us” is still “minimal brain dysfunction”. Descriptive, yet non-specific!

    IMHO, a developmental disability is not a diagnosis, per se. A developmental disability is a condition in which an affected individual’s development (i.e., how they function in terms of cognition and behavior) is “outside the curve”. By “outside the curve” I refer to the so-called bell curve which is used to describe the range of a given attribute in a group.

    Consider height: As Rick Green has correctly observed, everybody has some height. Some have more than others. If you gatherered all the adults in the world together and measured them all and then plotted their heights you’d find the plot (graph) looked bell-shaped. Most folks are medium-sized. Few are very short; few are very tall.

    Now, consider a developemental critera, like reading or attention (what’d I just write?). Then measure that. Folks who are too far one way or another are “outside the curve” and–depending on the circumstances–are “disordered” on way or another.

    I’m not sure if this responds to your question. There’s always bad science out there (see, there’s even a curve for that!).

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    in reply to: University/College Faculty with AD/HD #103664
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    ellamama
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    Congratulations! I’m a PhD/ADHD m’self; I’ve no doubt there’re many in academia who–diagnosed or not–have ADHD and/or LDs, I’m not sure that I’d walk into a classroom wearing an AD/HD t-shirt, but I think that there shouldn’t be any trouble with admitting you’re not good at, e.g., getting paperwork in on time. How this may/will impact your career depends on LOTS of different factors, in particular your area of study and the institution where you’re located. For an assortment of reasons, I’m not in a university, I work for a consulting firm. As such, I can (in theory) rely on the support of others. If you’re in a place where you’ll have to do grant writing being one of those “last minute creative thinkers” can be a tremendous asset–but only if you (or someone else) can manage to get all the forms filled in and everything done ON TIME.

    I’m not sure if this helped, but, IMHO, I promise you won’t be the only one in academia with ADHD! Good luck!

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    in reply to: ADD and Narcoleptic #103148
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    ellamama
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    This is really interesting. For years I’ve had issues with “excessive daytime sleepiness”. Despite what feels like sufficient and high quality sleep I’ve fallen asleep in way too many inappropriate situations, e.g. singing in a chorus during an instrumental section where we were permitted to be seated; jury duty; etc. A few years ago, I had a sleep study to rule out narcolepsy. It didn’t show anything other than wriggle my feet (which I’ve done since childhood). The doctor prescribed Provigil for times when I was afraid falling alseep would be dangerous (e.g., driving on a long trip). It was very helpful for ADHD, but pooped out in the afternoon. I’ve found Concerta more helpful.

    But I’m still really interesting in the sleep issue. It’s only recently that I’ve realized the falling alseep problem is (presumably) ADHD-related.

    Gee, now it’s time for me to go to bed!

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    in reply to: CHADD Charges #100738
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    ellamama
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    I’m sorry you’re having a rough time, Sandra. Have you tried calling CHADD and asking if they’ve a sliding scale or other means for folks who want to join but whose incomes can’t handle it? It might vary chapter by chapter, but I’d be really surprized if they couldn’t do something for you.

    Good luck!

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    in reply to: TED Talks: The Power of Vulnerability #99902
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    ellamama
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    Amen, Larynxa!

    This past weekend, I was lucky enough to get to see the U.S. figure skating championships. It was facinating to see how some skaters were incredibly popular with the audience, despite mishaps.

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    in reply to: For your next video…(help with educators) #99206
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    ellamama
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    This is an INCREDIBLY important issue. Nevertheless, I think it’d be really hard for Totally ADD to pull this off. As *fabulous* as their resources are, this issue comes down not only to national education system issues, but state/provincial and local issues. If Totally ADD wants to add to its resource links, I’d suggest these:

    If your want to see the actual US legislation related to IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Education Act of 2004): http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=108_cong_public_laws&docid=f:publ446.108

    If you want to geek-out on this stuff even more, here’s a link to FAQ related to IEPs (Individual Education Plans): http://frwebgate.access.gpo.gov/cgi-bin/getdoc.cgi?dbname=108_cong_public_laws&docid=f:publ446.108

    A nice overview of issues from Health Central: http://www.healthcentral.com/adhd/education.html

    Another nice, less detailed overview can be viewed here: http://www.additudemag.com/adhd/article/711.html

    That said–at least within the US–public schools are obligated by federal law to accommodate kids with “special needs” (of course, I think all kids have special needs–it’s just that they’re not all the same:-)). As I like to say ADHD is not an excuse, it’s an explaination.

    On the other hand, listening to friends and relatives of mine who’re teachers, I’m sympathetic to their issues, too. Classrooms are often overcrowded. Lots of classes have lots of kids with potentially competing IEP’s. E.g., My aunt complained that one year her room had more kids who were supposed to receive “preferential seating” than the classroom could accommodate. I.e., there’s only one front row; the whole class won’t fit there.

    I don’t know if I helped anybody or rambled too much (as I am wont to do…) but suffice it to say that this is a REALLY complex issue with no easy answers.

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    in reply to: Best "You are calm in a crisis" #97350
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    ellamama
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    What wonderful stories! Gosh, where should I begin?!

    I’m wondering if the challenges with time management can be an advantage. Can we break-down time? Here’s a car crash story: Decades ago (I’d just turned 18), I was working as a volunteer in a very rural area in the Appalachain Mountains in Kentucky. Among my jobs, I delivered medical supplies to from the main hospital to outlying clinics and returned with labratory samples, etc. The area roads were mountanous, winding, poorly kept, undivided 2-lane highways upon which most traffic was coal trucks hauling freshly mined coal. I was driving a subcompact 2 door,

    I was on my way back to the hospital when I came to a T-intersection. I slowed to make a left turn and just as I was into the turn, a fully loaded coal truck came around a blind curve into the intersection. It was one of those moments which occurred in a split second, but in my mind time spread out. I knew now matter what there’s be impact between my car and the truck. If either of us turned off the road avoid impact we’d either drive into the side of a mountain or off the road down off the mountainside. I knew as a smaller vehicle, I had all the advantage in so far as manoverability. If I didn’t turn at all, the most likely impact would involve my car going under the truck which I anticipated would result in decapitation to me and serious injuries to my 2 passengers.

    I aimed for the trucks tires. A dramatic impact followed: crash then slience–except for the whine and grunt of the truck’s air brakes and down shifting to stop.

    I assessed myself and my passengers. Aside from complete hysteria on the part of my passengers, we were all unhurt. I got out to assess the car: totalled. I trotted down the road to check in with the truck driver. He’d managed to stop a few 100 M down the road. He lept from his cab and ran into me and grabbed my shoulders, “How many got killed?!”

    “What?”

    “The crash! How many got killed?”

    “None.” I shook my head with a growing sense of confusion.

    “Where’s the driver?” The driver was clearly upset.

    “You’re lookin’ at her.”

    The truck driver’s face froze and he dropped to his knees, “PRAISE THE LORD!”

    At this point–as the newly arrived Boston Yankee in Appalachia–I was wholly baffled. The truck driver then raised up and walked with me back to the car. All the way he explained how, although he’d not yet killed anybody with his truck, that all the coal truck drivers knew that the risk was high. He used his CB radio to alert the State Police, etc.

    As various folks showed up on scene, I learned that these sorts of accidents were all too common in the region. Often, there were mortalities, nearly always serious inuuries. Nobody could ever recall anybody walking away–unscathed–from a similar incident. To add to my own shock, although I was wearing a seatbelt, neither passenger was (NOTE: Always make certain all your passengers are wearing a seatbelt!)

    How it can take me an hour to figure out where to file one piece of paper in my office yet in a split second figure out how to avoid certain death is beyond me. While I hope Concerta can help with the filing, I hope it doesn’t mess with my ability to turn on a dime:-)

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    ellamama
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    The issue isn’t testing-that’s pretty much done. I’ve never volunteered at our “zoned” public school. Honestly, as much as I want to support public schools, our zoned public school is so bad it’s being taken over by the state. Recently, there was a community “help the school” day where neighbors painted, etc. and the principal never even showed up.

    The issue is making choices about educational environments. Which is better: remaining in a school where she’ll most likely be pulled from “regular” classes to get extra help or to switch to a school where such extra help is integrated into the curriculum. There’s stigma associated with each scenario.

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    ellamama
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    @ Rufus: Because my daughter’s in a private school, we’re on our own. This is good news and bad news. On the one hand, public schools are obligated to provide education for all kids; on the other, they don’t always do it ideally. The result is that–presuming we remain private (which we’ll do unless we move–and we’re not planning on that!)–we’ll have to do all this ourselves. And this is fine. Ironically enough, I’m wholly prepared to deal with the situation and our community has oodles of excellent (albeit pricey) resources.

    I’m not sure the situation in Canada, but within the US, states must follow certain requirements regarding timeing of testing, intervention, etc. Of course, how this is done in the real world is a whole other issue…

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    in reply to: frustrated -have ADHD and 2 children with it #97852
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    ellamama
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    I can offer little more than empathy. A few weeks ago my 7 y.o. daughter–who has never been a morning person–was particularly slow to rise and get out the door. In an effort to get some breakfast into her, I wrapped up a toasted waffle sandwich for her to eat en route to school. As we pulled into the driveway, I realized that she’d disassembled the sandwich and had been using the pieces to create assorted geometric forms. As we approached the drop off area, I implored her to eat as quickly as possible–they don’t permit kids to eat en route to class.

    As it happened, it was the head of the lower school who opened the door at drop off. She saw the waffle and said to me, “Oh, you know you really need to make sure she eats breakfast at home before she arrives at school.”

    I wanted to wring the woman’s neck, screaming, “Look lady! You want to come to my house and take care of this?! You’ve got a choice: (1) a kid who’s here on time and with some food; (2) a kid who’s here on time without food, or; (3) a kid who’s late who had breakfast at home.” Instead, I just said, “Umm hmm.”

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    ellamama
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    We did our assessments separately and then compaired notes. Most of the time we were “on the same page” but my DH totally missed the “little behaviors”. There was a question about thumb sucking. I answered “often” because although my DD doesn’t suck her thumb, she does suck her other fingers, hair, clothing, and will mouth just about anything she holds idly in her hands. I explained this to my DH and he said, “But the question asked about thumb sucking.”

    *sigh* My DH’s (ironically enough) a neurologist. When I described this whole issue to the pediatric neurologist we visited yesterday she just laughed, “Oh, he’s just a neurologist.” That said, she explained that it’s not uncommon to have any parents offer widely differing assessments. She further commented that she never relies on fathers/men to assess social issues, i.e., what a child’s friends and their social interactions are like.

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