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  • in reply to: Company Wants Accommodation Review #118433

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    Thanks for your advice, Larynxa

    I will definitely use those. I cannot help but think that a major part of poor performance is not only the affects of ADHD, but the residual effects of all the stress I went through to assert my rights in the first place.

    Where I work, I’m easily twice the average age of everyone in my department. Not that I am paranoid, but I have seen a lot of workers my age not get promotions (will resulting pay raise) or opportunities for  new and  interesting assignments; sometimes are just  gone. We just went through a 2% staff reduction and almost all (I’d venture to say all) were people with long service. Meanwhile, we still have junior workers and contractors still on staff. My wife claims that declaring my disability may have prevented getting laid-off  for some sort of affirmative action quota. (I live in Ontario). Me? I’m planning to retire within the year, but I want to retire on my terms, not theirs, but they are certainly pushing very hard.

     

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    in reply to: Motor Vehicle Collision and ADHD symptom relapse? #115014

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    Thanks, everyone, for your kindness and encouragement.

    Today was actually the first day since the accident almost two months ago that I’m starting to feel more “with it”. To be honest, I never thought it would have impacted me this way. We like to think we can handle almost anything, then, Wham! Something out of the blue turns your world upside down. Somebody once said life is the only time where the lesson comes after the test.

    One of my friends at work suggested I should have really taken some extended time off after the collision because, with all the stressors at work, you’re really not helping your recovery at all. I’m going to see my doctor this week and see if I can arrange some extended time away from work for a while. Sitting 8 or more hours per day in front of a computer doesn’t help make my neck and back feel any better.

    As far as the insurance company is concerned, I will disclose my ADHD on the medical report. It’s not like I haven’t been proactive in getting treatment. You could say I was hyper-focusing on my treatment. After all, it wasn’t the cause of the accident. Here in Ontario, we have “no-fault” insurance which means you deal with your own insurance company and that sometimes limits your rights for “fair” compensation, although there are lawyers that will take on the insurance company on for you. I’m not a litigious person by nature and I don’t even want to go there. This can be a long drawn out affair and for me, just rehash everything that happened over a longer period of time. Time to move on.

    One thing I’ve learned after battling with my employer for accommodation for ADHD is that you have to not only advocate for yourself, but educate others as well. As I said, there are a lot of misconceptions out there; some personal, some institutional, about ADHD. I figured out a while ago that the only thing wrong with ADHD is how some people react to it with denial or prejudice or misinformation. If I have to teach the insurance company that ADHD, if controlled, is not any worse than any other medical condition, then I guess I have to do that.

    Thanks again, everyone!

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    in reply to: ADHD, working memory, and words. A battleground. #108173

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    Working memory is very much part of having ADHD, so you’re not alone. Some of the things I’ve done to help improve my memory include a couple of apps from iTunes such as Smart Hand’s Memory Training and a completely silly one for kids called Memory Pro.

    Smart Hand’s flashes a series of numbers from 0 to 9 in a random order and locations on the display for several seconds, then you attempt to repeat the sequence within several seconds. Frustrating at first, but I find it helps.

    The second one, as I said, is completely silly, but consists of matching pairs of cute animal icons by selecting any two of 24 tiles. I’m sure there are others you can download from iTunes.

    The current thinking about thisis a concept called neuroplasticity, meaning the brain can change structurally and functionally when worked, much like constant exercise improves muscle tone. It allows the brain to create new links or re-establish older, less used ones.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neuroplasticity

    There are several computer-based memory training tools of which Cogmed is one.

    http://www.cogmed.com/

    But there are several other similar programs on-line. There is some controversy about the results claimed by Cogmed and it is expensive, but it was recommended to me by my psychologist.

    I also do Soduku puzzles on my iPhone also.

    My research into working memory seems to indicate these types of memory tools requires using them up to 20 times a day. I haven’t actually done the 20 times per day, but I have noticed that even with casual use, there seems to be an overall improve.

    I also work with words and here’s a couple of tips I use to overcome not recalling the correct word when needed. Just write anything on the page, even if it’s not the word you want, you can look into that later. Or leave that space blank and fill in the word later when you do recollect it. The important thing, I think, is to get the idea down without interrupting the flow. Much like spelling, don’t get hung up on perfection at this point.

    Another technique I use is Mind Mapping. That helps you get the ideas down quickly while they’re in your head.

    http://www.mindmapping.com/

    I also do crossword puzzles and it’s amazing how that improved your vocabulary and ability to recall words as required, not to mention the neuroplasticity thing.

    Then there is “Toastmasters Interantional” that I have also been thinking about. And in speaking with several co-workers who’ve done it, they said helped them not only speak better, but have learned techniques to think on their feet when giving speeches, I think that may be beneficial to writers such as us.

    http://www.toastmasters.org/

    Hope this helps…and good luck.

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    in reply to: I "came out" to my employer #103540

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    I think the most important thing to remember in all of this is: do you like your job and like working there? Because once you start advocating for your rights at work it can get very weird, very quickly. This would be a big CLM (Career Limiting Move).

    So unless your CEO has ADD up the wazoo, expect to be marginalized such as when interesting and important projects are handed to junior people or you find yourself being past over for promotion because of “‘your condition”. It may not be said quite that way, but their intent is obvious…

    Choose freely.

    Hope this helps….and good luck

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    in reply to: I "came out" to my employer #103538

    ADDled
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    Hi, Stargoop!

    It sound to me that boundaries have to bet set regarding what is appropriate and not appropriate to say in your workplace about your ADD. This all should have been confidential, so for a management team to freely discuss your disability, especially when you ‘re not here to defend yourself is unethical to say the least.

    In addition to all of the above, there are relevant provincial/state labour laws or human rights codes that usually have specific language about harassment and bullying.

    The bullying aspect is now becoming more and more of an issue in the workplace and many jurisdictions are enacting anti-bulling legislation. And it seems that there is a lot more of this happening because many employees don’t have unions now, so companies can basically stomp on your rights any time they want, in my opinion. Now before this gets into a “unions protect lazy workers, promote mediocracy and aren’t needed anymore” debate, they are usually more aware of human rights and are in a better position to protect your rights. I can say this because I have been on both sides of the fence and my life was generally better when a union member. If you are a member, let them fight that battle for you.

    And as everyone has indicated here….do not trust your HR department. They are not your friend and are really the “blunt object of corporate policy”. Avoid them.

    Another option might be contacting a labour lawyer just to get a reading on what can be done in your case. Sometimes just a letter from a lawyer to your HR department can prevent further bullying by your superiors.

    The tape recording works, too. In my case I asked my supervisor during a “performance improvement plan” if I can tape the meeting “because having ADD means I have poor short term memory and can’t always remember what we said”, well, he went pale. Because he knew he had crossed the line several times.

    The last thing you may consider should you decide to go the HR route, is to avoid the low-level flunkies and go right up the chain of command to the manager, director an present your concerns directly to him/her. The flunkies will do the least amount to address your issues hoping you’ll go away. Sometimes the HR head have a little more knowledge of the impact of bulling and harassment in the workplace and be in a better position to help you. Hopefully.

    Hope this helps…and good luck.

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    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    Bguntoor

    Sounds like what I do in my line of work.

    Because of the complexity of the things I deal with, I found it helpful to care with my a small note book. I use this for taking notes when discussing anything with my peers or supervisors, and when being taught new sotfware or application. Ask if you can use a tape recorder or any other audio recording device. I can’t – it’s against company policy.

    I think this may have something to do with my lack of “non verbal working memory” where it’s difficult for me to retain anything using the traditional teaching methods (retention by rote). In many cases, it means I can’t remember what I’ve been shown, so I have to “re-learn” it all over. It also means I can’t remember what has failed in the past, so there is a lack of experiential data to guide me.

    You see, that’s why I can’t play card games – can’t remember the rules. But I can do crossword and sudoku puzzles forever.

    I have been trying to take more frequent breaks, whether it’s getting up to get a tea, or just walk around the office for a few minutes. This helps me “chunk” my work into smaller work packages and prevents me from hyper-focusing. I call that falling into the rabbit hole. When I chunk things they become discreet little tasks that I can see easier, instead of being paralyzed by the whole problem.

    If you can get a copy of “Taking Charge of Adult ADHD” by Russell Barkley, it’s has a really good section about executive functioning (time management, working memory, self-motivation, self-regulation, self-activation) impairments and how to work around them. I think it’s the executive functioning thing we both have to work on, Bguntoor.

    Hope this helps…and good luck.

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    in reply to: In a spin. #95684

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    Why should we “be” anything at all when we can just “be”?

    Yah, I know, a Zen riddle wrapped on a koan…

    The workplace has changed, and possible not for the better, I think. What I used to believe is that you studied and worked hard to learn chosen profession. You became an expert with certain “perfect knowledge” of you work. A specialist, I suppose.

    Recently, though, I’ve come to believe that knowledge has been “commodified”, a thing to buy and sell or use when organizational need requires it. The skill is all about managing the knowledge of knowledge: how to access and deploy knowledge without actually possessing it.

    If knowledge is required, the organization simply acquires only as much knowledge it needs to perform what is required. No more. That would be a waste of capital, a waste of resources. In other words, sub-contract everything out as possible.

    What this means careerwise, is that the speciality is now about doing as many functions within an organization as possible. You don’t have to be good at any one particular thing, but be able to do a lot of little things “just well enough” on an ad hoc basis.

    To me, this sounds a lot like multi-tasking (which doesn’t really exist – you’re just re-focusing rapidly) and you’d thing organizations would be beating a path to hire people like ourselves for doing this sort of work. But I don’t think that really happens.

    All the stories I read here about problems in the workplace relating to ADHD have revealed to me that we still aren’t being accepted for what we can do. We are constantly reminded about what we can’t do. Mostly because organizations aren’t really equipped to deal with a complete change of corporate culture when hiring people who have different cognitive abilities. That still remains the barrier. And while the organizations understand the need for a change in how work is done, decisions are still made by people who are, for the most part, linear thinkers, and stand to loose a lot of control they’ve spend years accumulating, to risk it by hiring a new kind of knowledge worker. The kind organizations know little about, but are afraid to learn about them. The ones they may not be able to control.

    What kills us is the routine stuff organizations impose on people in terms of paperwork, dubious and questionable corporate policies and the general “dumbing down” of intelligence. Those things that we as ADHD people aren’t sometimes too good at.

    A career now is about being, and doing, as many things to an organization as possible – generalist. To learn how to lean quickly is what’s going to be needed.

    Hope this helps…and good luck.

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    in reply to: ADD Timers #97732

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    I have the battery operated version of the Time Timer and it’s basically a count down timer. You set it for up to 60 minutes and the red area lets you see how much time is remaining.

    Can you not set the iPod for various alarms?

    Hope this helps….and good luck.

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    in reply to: Organization and Time Management HELP! #91801

    ADDled
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    Distracted66

    I’m interested in learning about your techniques because my job has requirements for a highly complex set of organizational skills.

    Thanks

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    in reply to: ADD and religion #98050

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    One aspect of Buddhism I like is that you are responsible for your own salvation. No one is going to do that for you. That, and the fact you’re not made to feel inferior because you don’t believe in their religion.

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    in reply to: ADHD family-member-to-be trying to sabotage me #98386

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    The are many aspects to ADD and that’s why it’s so difficult to diagnose in some cases. Just because you do not bounce off the walls as typically believed by non ADDers, doesn’t mean you may not have it.

    Sound to me as if the girlfriend is practicing psychiatry without a license: dangerous and illegal in some places in addition to not maintaining confidentiality. Surely she would have learned these along the way.

    It’s people such as the girlfriend that marginalize our ADD.

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    in reply to: Help! my boss doesn't beleve in ADD #98595

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    Hi, David

    For people like us with ADD in the workplace, you have to learn to advocate for yourself in these situations. Public awareness and acceptance is starting to change, although slowly. If you check online, you will find a lot of business e-zines (electronic magazines) have articles about the impact of ADD in the workplace and provide useful information to employers on how to help people with ADD succeed. That may be another source of information you can print and provide to your boss.

    The good thing is that your boss is looking to help you. Maybe direct him to this site. Or, print some of the general information available here at this website.

    I’d say you may need to check whatever federal or provincial (do you use the term provinces or states in Oz?) legislation to protect worker’s rights and does it include specific language for people with mental disabilities? In Canada, especially in Ontario, ADD is considered a mental disability and you have rights under legislation. This would be a good thing to know, but filing a complaint using them, or under human rights tribunals or committees should be the last resort. Always try to find accommodation for your ADD working with your boss rather than clobbering him with government investigations. Just be armed with that information and gently inform your boss that under legislation that ADD is recognized as a mental disability, if that is indeed the case.

    Are you a member of a union? Perhaps they can help you deal with your boss.

    Yes, it’s tough to deal with all this yourself. But because, as ADDers, when we choose to do something we can work harder and longer than most anyone else and this may be the case for you also. The other thing is that by researching all this you will feel a little better about yourself. If reading and writing are difficult for you, do you have anyone in your immediate family or friends that can help you with all this? Or, family service agencies may have counselors that can help and advise you.

    Hope this helps…and good luck.

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    in reply to: Merry Christmas!! – OT #98455

    ADDled
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    Post count: 121

    Merry Christmas and/or Happy Holidays…

    This is probably the most trying time of the year for us. Let’s remember to take our meds and really rely on all our coping skills we’ve learned so far.

    <humour>So much stimulation, so few meds….</humour>

    It’s kinda interesting to watch all the neuro-norms (neurologically normal people…what I like to call people without ADHD) try and cope with the over-stimulation and their lack of coping skills at this time of year. I hope maybe they’ll understand our world a little more and know something about what we face throughout the rest of year.

    Most of all, let’s just “be”.

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    ADDled
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    That sounds like Dr J’s territory. As a suggestion, could your doctor prescribe blood pressure medication to control the side effects of stimulants to prevent a heart attack if that’s his concern? Seems to be a reasonable solution and I’m surprised your doctor didn’t suggest that.

    I’m just using my intuition here, but does he believe that ADD exists and exists in adults? Maybe he’s trying to avoid that argument? Hard to believe, but there are some doctors that refuse to accept the reality of our condition (for lack of a better word…).

    I would definitely get a second opinion.

    Merry Christmas and/or Happy Holidays to all.

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    in reply to: Shiny new Vyvanse 'script #97987

    ADDled
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    I’ve had the best results with this stuff…made a world of difference.

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Viewing 15 posts - 16 through 30 (of 103 total)