Synaptol-Homeopathic Substitutes for ADD

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Synaptol-Homeopathic Substitutes for ADD 2011-08-18T18:28:58+00:00

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  • #89935
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    Anonymous
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    I just purchased Synaptol, a homeopathic remedy for ADD, and I was wondering if anyone else has heard of it or had success with it. I’d like to try something to help with my focus, and inattention issues – but don’t want to go on prescription medications for it. Any thoughts on the homeopathic route would really help. Thanks.

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    #107451
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    Anonymous
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    Are there any independent studies for this treatment? I’ve not run across any over the counter homeopathic treatments that have gone through any sort of trials to verify their effectiveness thus far.

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    #107452
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    g.laiya
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    Post count: 116

    yeah i was wondering too if anyone has experience with this. i keep seeing the ads, and know homeopathic meds are about the safest choice you could possibly make, but would like some feedback on effectiveness from the community here?

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    #107453
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    Patte Rosebank
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    Homeopathic meds are NOT “about the safest choice you could possibly make”!

    They lack the double-blind, clinical trials to prove their safety and effectiveness. Also, many of them are not fully tested & approved by government health authorities. And they are generally not a suitable alternative to legitimate medical treatments.

    Recently, Cold FX, long-promoted as a safe & effective way to prevent colds, was completely debunked. It was also proven to be dangerous when taken by diabetics, and in conjunction with certain other medications.

    “Natural” doesn’t necessarily mean “safe”. There are many natural plant and chemical substances which are deadly. For example: foxglove (digitalis), belladonna (AKA deadly nightshade), sulfuric acid, and arnica (if consumed internally).

    Do your homework, and use your head, before investing your hopes and your money in any alternative treatments. And never stop taking your prescribed meds without consulting your doctor first.

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    #107454
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    Robbo
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    Thanks Larynxa,

    well said. I tend to be cautious about strong opinions in any direction they’re pointed, but I have to agree with you here. It’s a bummer, but the truth is, tons of the stuff google ads splatter across our screen are strictly for the money period. The new “old west” is the Internet, and that includes millions of snake oil salesmen. I’ll never really know for sure if Gingko Biloba helped me as much as I thought it did. It could have been just a strong placebo affect. Same thing with Fish oil. It’s not always a bad thing to be a little pessimistic.

    And mind mind just keeps going back n forth between doubt and faith…

    An open mind is an important thing too, I just have to find some kind of balance between two extremes. It’s a big messy struggle figuring out what’s real and what ain’t. One opinion is exactly that, just one single opinion.

    I like the way The Outlaw Josey Wales handles the traveling snake oil salesmen in that old Clint Eastwood classic.

    “How’s it work on stains? Splat!” Great movie huh?

    PS, I just clicked on mrn2524’s profile (member in blue under the name) just this one post, and a member since August 2011. Interesting.

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    #107455
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    g.laiya
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    Post count: 116

    larynxa you are absolutely right that “natural” does not equal “safe”.however, homeopathic meds are quite unique in that it is virtually impossible to overdose on them, they are generally safe to use with other medications and other supplements, and free of unpleasant side effects that are all too common with prescription medications and even high doses of herbal medicines and vitamin and mineral supplements. i’ve personally used a few diifferent homeopathic remedies with good effect (phytofed nasal decongestant, formula 303, and migra spray)….but i’m far from an expert on them.

    i’m thinking though that what you may have been getting at is that they are not the “best available” treatment/suitable alternative treatmen for adhd….which, again, you are likely correct. i too do not want to waste money/time/ hopes on something worthless. which is why i was hoping to get some feedback from *real* members here who have tried it or know someone who has.

    i’m not going off any add meds to try alternatives as i’m not on any yet. still haven’t worked up the courage to go to my pcp to get the psych referral, but will be seeing him next week for some other issues so maybe will address it then.

    gotta run again – ttfn!

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    #107456
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    Anonymous
    Post count: 14412

    mrn2524

    Did you try the Synaptol and did it work for you?

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    #107457
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    kc5jck
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    Post count: 846

    We haven’t heard from mm2524 since his initial post over a year ago, probably poisoned by a bad batch of snake oil. RIP

    As indicated above, natural doesn’t mean safe. The injection I received of brown recluse venom, although natural in its synthesis and injection, left me feeling “out of sorts” for a day or two and caused a nasty sore at the site of introduction. I can report that I did not see any benefits. On the other hand, a similar injection of wasp venom had me moving around like someone fifty years my junior, although the effect was temporary, about 10-15 seconds. And, I think during that brief time, cleared up my ADHD.

    So if you ask me, go for the wasp venom over that of the brown recluse. And get the XR if available.

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    #107458
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    kc5jck
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    Post count: 846

    You can buy Synaptol through Amazon.com. They have 28 customer reviews averaging 2.9 out a possible five. You can go to Amazon to read what people said. It’s probably as good a place as any for decision making information. A bottle costs about $30, but doesn’t indicate dosage information.

    Following is a sample of the reviews (honest):

    1.0 out of 5 stars Please check ingredients!, May 31, 2012

    By Rowyntree (Chesterton, IN United States) – See all my reviewsThis review is from: Synaptol ADD ADHD Symptom Relief Medicine for Children and Adults. All-Natural Homeopathic Medicine Quickly Relieves ADD ADHD Symptoms Including Hyperactivity, Inattentiveness, and Difficulty Concentrating. 1 Bottle – Direct from Manufacturer. (Health and Beauty)

    The following contains the list of ingredients in Synaptol as provided by their website. Homeopathic and natural do not automatically mean they are safe. It’s been scientifically proven that a group given placebos versus a tried & true medication will show improvement. There’s a lot in Synaptol that I myself would not take, let alone give to my child. PLEASE CHECK INGREDIENTS BEFORE YOU GIVE ANYTHING TO YOUR CHILD.

    INGREDIENTS LIST IN SYNAPTOL

    Adrenalium is a sweetener

    B. Tinctoria is used as an antiseptic, to treat sore muscles, as a laxative, treats scarlet fever (what does a laxative has to do with ADD?)

    S. Laterifolia is used to treat rabies, tremors and is an antispasmodic (you’re going to need that antispasmodic if you’re using a laxative)

    Medorrhinum is used to treat UTI’s, ovarian pain, testicular pain, genital warts & herpes (I don’t believe these are related to ADD)

    Phosphorus is used for anxiety, fear, digestive disorders, and respiratory ailments (you’re going to have digestive disorders due to all the laxatives in this concoction)

    V.Odorata is used for congestion and coughs (What does this have to do with ADD?)

    A. Mellifca is used for hives, UTI’s, allergies, sore throats, rashes and constipation (oh look, another laxative!)

    A. Sativa is used for anxiety, fatigue and depression (I think this is only thrown in so they can make their claims. When you consider all the other junk thrown in, this tiny amount can’t help)

    S. Moschatus is used in perfumes in place of musk (so why use it in an ADD medication)

    Litsea Cubeba is an anti-inflammatory, used for it’s calming properties and for fatigue, anxiety and depression (again, it’s in a tiny amount, so it’s not going to help)

    Aesculus Hippocastanum is used for hemorrhoids (which you got from all the laxatives)

    Madia Elegans (Wild Coreoposis, Tarweed) the seeds are eaten for food, the oil is used for treating burns (good to know this ADD medication will also treat those pesky burns)

    Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) is used for indigestion and gas (which you now have because of the laxatives)

    Myosotis Sylvatica (Forget Me Not) is used for the lungs, coughs, colds, diarrhea, nose bleeds (this will help stop the constant diarrhea you now have thanks to the laxatives)

    Ranunculus Occidentalis (Buttercup) was used as a poison by native North American Indians, it’s also used for colds, headaches and upper respiratory ailments (not related to ADD)

    Scleranthus Annuus is used for mood swings and motion sickness (possibly help, but in such a small amount, doubtful)

    CHECK THE INGREDIENTS BEFORE YOU GIVE ANY MEDICATION TO A CHILD.

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    #107459
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    Robbo
    Member
    Post count: 929

    Did you try it?, I’m not gonna try it. Hey!, let’s get mickey, he likes it!, he’ll try anything.

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